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Search for Biblical Geographical Locations

Julian Spriggs M.A.

This page lists a growing number of the geographical locations where events described in the Bible took place. It gives the Biblical name of the location, its modern name, and the modern nation where it is sited. It also gives the latitude and longitude of the location, and links to Google maps terrain and satellite view, if available. There is a link to the page on Wikipedia about the location, and to the Holy Land Photos site, if these are available. Links to other websites are given if available.

The locations are listed in alphabetical order, and can be filtered by the name of the modern nation and the Bible period or people that the location is associated with. Locations can also be searched by name.

Select modern nation
Select Bible period
Select location associated with:

Search by biblical location (auto-completes)

117 locations found

123456
Amphipolis
Serres, Central Macedonia Greece
40° 49' N, 23° 50' E
Acts
Acts 17:1
Road Map
Satellite View
Wikipedia
Holy Land Photos

 

Luke records that Paul and Barnabas passed through the two cities of Amphipolis and Apollonia on the Second Missionary Journey without giving any further details. It is not known whether Paul stopped any longer than one night in each place, or did any missionary work there. Both cities lay on the Via Egnatia, the direct route between Philippi and Thessalonica.

Amphipolis was a large city, with extensive archaeological remains. There is a large burial mound and the famous lion of Amphipolis.

Antioch (Pisidia)
Yalvac, Isparta Province Turkey
38° 18' N, 31° 11' E
Acts
Acts 13:14
Road Map
Satellite View
Wikipedia
Holy Land Photos
Turkish Museums
 
The site of Pisidian Antioch is near the Turkish town of Yalvac at the western edge of the Anatolian Plateau. It was located at a crossroads, so became an important trading and communication centre. The city was established in the third or fourth century BC, and designated as a Roman colony in the province of Galatia by the Emperor Augustus in 25 BC, after which many buildings had been constructed. Excavated remains include a monumental gate, streets, a small theatre, a Temple to Augustus and a bathhouse. There are also remains of a large church dedicated to St Paul, also known as the 'Great Basilica'. It has been claimed that the church was originally built on the site of the Jewish synagogue where Paul preached (Acts 13:16-41). Antioch remained an important centre of the church for several centuries.
Antioch (Syria)
Antakya, Hatay Province Turkey
36° 12' N, 36° 11' E
Acts
Acts 11:19-30, 13:1-3
Road Map
Satellite View
Wikipedia
Holy Land Photos
Turkish Museums
 
Antioch in Syria, also known as Antioch on the Orontes, is now the city of Antakya in the Hatay province of Turkey. It founded by Seleucus I around 300 BC, as the capital of the Kingdom of Syria. It was the first predominantly Gentile church, where the believers were first called 'Christians' (Acts 11:19-26), and became one of the most important Christian centres. The church in Antioch sent Paul and Barnabas out on their missionary journeys (13:1-3). After each journey, Paul returned to this church.
Apollonia
Pirgos Apollonias, Kavala Greece
40° 44' N, 24° 08' E
Acts
Acts 17:1
Road Map



 
Apollonia was a small town lying on the Via Egnatia, south of Lake Bolbe, which Paul and Silas passed through when travelling from Philippi to Thessalonica. No excavations have taken place here.
Arad
Negev Israel
31° 17' N, 35° 08' E
Exodus and Conquest, United Monarchy, Divided monarchy
Num 21:1, 33:40, Josh 12:14
Road Map
Satellite View
Wikipedia
Holy Land Photos
Madain Project
 

Arad was a Canaanite city in the Negeb inhabited at the time of Moses and Joshua. Their king attacked Israel when they began to enter the Promised Land, but was defeated by the Israelites (Josh 12:14). "When the Canaanite, the king of Arad, who lived in the Negeb, heard that Israel was coming ..." (Num 21:1, 33:40).

A fortress was built by the Kingdom of Judea probably to defend the land from the Edomites. It contained a whole temple, which is described on tablets found on the site as a 'temple to Yahweh'. Within the temple was a high place containing smooth standing stones, representing the presence of Yahweh, and altars. Remains of the incense on the altars have recently been analysed and found to contain frankincense and cannabis.

Excavation of the site of Arad began in the 1960's. It is located west of the Dead Sea, about 10 km (6 miles) west of the modern town of Arad.

A replica of the high place from Arad is displayed in the Israel Museum in Jerusalem.

Arnon (River)
Wadi Mujib Jordan
31° 28' N, 35° 34' E
Exodus and Conquest
Num 21:13, Deut 2:24, Josh 12:1, Judges 11
Road Map
Satellite View
Wikipedia
Holy Land Photos

 

The river Arnon is now known as the Wadi Mujib. It has seven tributaries and flows through Jordan to the Dead Sea. It flows through a deep gorge, which is now an important nature reserve with great biodiversity.

It formed the boundary between Moab to the south and the Ammonites to the north (Num 21:13). After passing through Moab, the Israelites sent messages to King Sihon of the Ammonites who would not let them pass through his land (Deut 2:24). It then formed the southern boundary of the trans-jordan tribe of Reuben (Josh 12:1). The king of the Ammonites tried to reclaim the land during the time of the judges (Judges 11).

Ashdod
Ashdod Israel
31° 48' N, 34° 39' E
Exodus and Conquest, Post-exilic, Acts
1 Sam 5:1, 6:17, Neh 13:23, Acts 8:40
Road Map
Satellite View
Wikipedia


 

Ashdod was one of the five cities of the Philistines, known as the Pentapolis, along with Ashkelon, Ekron, Gath and Gaza (Josh 13:3). They are often named together in judgement oracles by the prophets:
"For three transgressions of Gaza, and for four, I will not revoke the punishment; because they carried into exile entire communities, to hand them over to Edom. So I will send a fire on the wall of Gaza, fire that shall devour its strongholds. I will cut off the inhabitants from Ashdod, and the one who holds the scepter from Ashkelon; I will turn my hand against Ekron, and the remnant of the Philistines shall perish." (Amos 1:6-8).
"For Gaza will be deserted, and Ashkelon shall become a desolation; Ashdod's people shall be driven out at noon, and Ekron shall be uprooted." (Zeph 2:4).
"Ashkelon shall see it and be afraid; Gaza too, and shall writhe in anguish; Ekron also, because its hopes are withered. The king shall perish from Gaza; Ashkelon shall be uninhabited; a mongrel people shall settle in Ashdod, and I will make an end of the pride of Philistia." (Zech 9:5-6)

Modern Ashdod is a large city and major port in Israel. The ancient Philistine town of Ashdod lies about 6 km (4 miles) to the south-east. It is known as Azotus in Greek, and Isdud in Arabic. It is an important archaeological site known as Tel Ashdod.

In the Book of Samuel, Ashdod is described as one of the important cities of the Philistines. After the Philistines had captured the ark of the covenant from Israel, they took it to Ashdod and placed in the temple of their god, Dagon (1 Sam 5:1). The following morning the statue of Dagon had fallen on its face before the ark. Then the next day the statue had fallen and was broken. The Lord struck the people of Ashdod with tumours, after which the ark was taken to Gath, then returned to Israel (1 Sam 5:1 - 6:9).

Nehemiah criticised the people of Israel for marrying women from Ashdod and other non-Jewish cities, and having children who could not speak the language of Judah (Neh 13:23).

In the Book of Acts, Philip the evangelist found himself at Azotus after witnessing to the Ethiopian eunuch (Acts 8:40).

Ashkelon
Ashkelon Israel
31° 40' N, 34° 34' E
Exodus and Conquest
Judges 14:10-20
Road Map
Satellite View
Wikipedia
Holy Land Photos

 

Ashkelon was one of the five cities of the Philistines, known as the Pentapolis, along with Ashdod, Ekron, Gath and Gaza (Josh 13:3). They are often named together in judgement oracles by the prophets:
"For three transgressions of Gaza, and for four, I will not revoke the punishment; because they carried into exile entire communities, to hand them over to Edom. So I will send a fire on the wall of Gaza, fire that shall devour its strongholds. I will cut off the inhabitants from Ashdod, and the one who holds the scepter from Ashkelon; I will turn my hand against Ekron, and the remnant of the Philistines shall perish." (Amos 1:6-8).
"For Gaza will be deserted, and Ashkelon shall become a desolation; Ashdod's people shall be driven out at noon, and Ekron shall be uprooted." (Zeph 2:4).
"Ashkelon shall see it and be afraid; Gaza too, and shall writhe in anguish; Ekron also, because its hopes are withered. The king shall perish from Gaza; Ashkelon shall be uninhabited; a mongrel people shall settle in Ashdod, and I will make an end of the pride of Philistia." (Zech 9:5-6)

Ashkelon or Ascalon was a major Philistine city on the shore of the Mediterranean Sea on the Philistine plain. It is 51 km (32 miles) south of Joppa and 19 km (12 miles) north northeast of Gaza. It is a large archaeological site to the south of the modern city of Ashkelon.

After Samson's wife explained his riddle, Samson went down to Ashkelon and killed thirty men, and gave their garments to those who had explained the riddle (Judges 14:10-20).

Assos
Ayvacik, Çanakkale Province Turkey
39° 29' N, 26° 20' E
Acts
Acts 20:13
Road Map
Satellite View
Wikipedia
Holy Land Photos
Turkish Museums
 

At the time of Paul's visit on his third missionary journey Assos was a larger town which has now shrunk to be the village of Behramkale, or Behram. It had an important strategic harbour. There is a significant archaeological site with wide-ranging views to the sea, containing a temple to Athene, a theatre, an agora and some remains of the ancient harbour below.

Luke does not describe any ministry that Paul did there. In Assos Paul rejoined his companions on the ship travelling to Mitylene on the island of Lesbos.

Assur
Saladin Governorate Iraq
35° 27' N, 43° 16' E
Divided monarchy
Road Map
Satellite View
Wikipedia

UNESCO
 

Assur was the capital of the Old Assyrian Empire during the second millennium BC, until it was conquered by the Babylonians under Hammurabi. During the neo-Assyrian Empire the capital was moved to other cities, first of all to Calah, then to Nineveh. The ruins of Assur are on the west bank of the River Tigris about 30km (20 miles) south of Mosul in Iraq, and are now a UNESCO World Heritage site, but have been damaged during the recent conflicts.

Athens
Greece
37° 58' N, 23° 43' E
Acts
Acts 17:16-34
Road Map
Satellite View
Wikipedia
Holy Land Photos

 

Athens has been the cultural and political centre of Greece for thousands of years. It is well known for its outstanding archaeological remains, including the Acropolis, temples and Agoras.

Luke recorded that Paul argued with people in the market-place (agora) every day (17:17). This is known as the Greek or Classical Agora today.

Paul gave his famous speech to the Epicurean and Stoic philosophers in front of the Areopagus on Mars Hill (17:16-31), very close to the Acropolis. There is a tablet recording Paul's speech inset into the rock.

Attalia
Antalya Turkey
36° 53' N, 30° 42' E
Acts
Acts 14:25
Road Map
Satellite View
Wikipedia
Holy Land Photos

 

Attalia was the port for Perga, where Paul probably landed from Cyprus on his first missionary journey. It is now the city of Antalya. He sailed from here back to Antioch at the end of his first journey (14:25).

Avaris / Goshen / Rameses
Tell el-Dab’a Egypt
30° 47' N, 31° 49' E
Exodus and Conquest
Road Map
Satellite View
Wikipedia


Babylon
Hillah, Babil Governorate Iraq
32° 33' N, 44° 25' E
Divided monarchy, Exilic
2 Kg 25, 2 Chr 36, Daniel
Road Map
Satellite View
Wikipedia

UNESCO
 

The ancient city of Babylon was built on both sides of the River Euphrates.

It became the capital of the neo-Babylonian Empire under Nebuchadnezzar, and the location of the exile of the Jews from Judah (2 Kg 25, 2 Chr 36). The prophet Daniel became prominent in the court of Babylon.

The ruins of Babylon are near the Iraqi town of Hillah, about 85 km (53 miles) south of Baghdad.

Balawat
Nineveh Governorate Iraq
36° 13' N, 43° 24' E
Divided monarchy
Road Map
Satellite View
Wikipedia


 

Balawat was a smaller town north-east of Nimrud (Calah). It is the site of the ancient Assyrian city of Imgur-Enlil, meaning 'Enlil agreed'. The city was founded by Ashurnasirpal II, with construction continuing under Shalmaneser III.

The reconstructed gates from a royal building built by Shalmaneser III in 845 BC in Balawat are displayed in the British Museum. The bronze bands are decorated with scenes of battle, including the Battle of Qarqar.

Beatitudes (Mount of)
Israel
32° 53' N, 35° 33' E
Gospels
Matt 5:3-10
Road Map
Satellite View
Wikipedia
Holy Land Photos

 

The site known as the Mount of Beatitudes is on the northwestern shore of the Sea of Galilee, between Capernaum and the archaeological site of Gennesaret, on the southern slopes of the Korazim Plateau.

An octagonal Catholic Church has been built as a commemorative church on the traditional site of where Jesus gave the Beatitudes (Matt 5:3-10) and the Sermon on the Mount (Matt 5-7).

The area to the south-west of the church acts as a natural amphitheatre, which would enable large crowds to hear the teaching of Jesus.

Beer-sheba
Tel Be'er Sheva, Negev Israel
31° 15' N, 34° 50' E
Patriarchs, Exodus and Conquest
Gen 21:25-34, 22:19, 26:17-25, 46:1, 1 Sam 3:20
Road Map
Satellite View
Wikipedia
Holy Land Photos
Israel Parks
Madain Project
 

Beer-sheba is mentioned 33 times in the Bible. It is often used when describing the southern limit of the promised land, such as "From Dan to Beersheba" (1 Sam 3:20).

Beer-sheba was a significant centre in the lives of the patriarchs. It was given its name meaning 'Well of Seven' or 'Well of the Oath' when Abraham and Abimelech made a covenant about the use of the well (Gen 21:25-34). Following this, Abraham planted a tamarisk tree and called on the name of the LORD. He also made Beer-sheba his place of residence (22:19).

Abraham's son Isaac also made an agreement after another argument with Abimelech about the use of the well in Beer-sheba, which had been stopped up following the death of Abraham (Gen 26:17-22). God then appeared to Isaac and renewed the promise to Abraham (Gen 26:23-25). God also appeared to Issac's son Jacob at Beer-sheba, telling him not to fear to go to Egypt to be reconciled with Joseph (Gen 46:1).

Beer-sheba was allocated to the tribes of Simeon and Judah (Josh 15:15:28; 19:2), and served as the southern outpost of the kingdom of Judah.

The site of Tel Be'er Sheva is close to the modern city of Beersheba, the administrative centre of the Negev region of Israel. Archaeological excavations have been taken place for more then 30 years.

A reconstructed four-horned altar from Beersheba is displayed in the Israel Museum in Jerusalem.

Beroea
Kar-Verria, Macedonia Greece
40° 31' N, 22° 12' E
Acts
Acts 17:10
Road Map
Satellite View
Wikipedia
Holy Land Photos
Discover Veria
 

Berea or Beroea, is now the small town of Veria. There are more recent mosaics recording Paul's visit on his second missionary journey, and remains of Roman roads. There is an old synagogue, which may have been built over the location of the ancient synagogue visited by Paul.

Beth-shemesh
Beit Shemesh, Jerusalem Israel
31° 45' N, 34° 59' E
Exodus and Conquest, United Monarchy, Divided monarchy
Josh 15:10, 21:6, 1 Sam 6:12-20, 1 Kg 4:9, 2 Kg 14:11-14
Road Map
Satellite View
Wikipedia
Holy Land Photos

 

Beth-shemesh means the 'house of the sun' or the 'temple of the sun' in Hebrew. It was originally named after the Canaanite sun-goddess Shapash, or Shemesh, who was worshipped there before the conquest of the land.

The border between the tribe of Judah and the tribe of Dan was defined as passing through Beth-shemesh (Josh 15:10). It was one of the 13 citires allocated to the Levitical Kohathites (Josh 21:16). There was a different settlement also called Beth-shemesh in the territory of the tribe of Naphtali (Josh 19:38).

Beth-shemesh in Judah was the first city that the ark of the covenant was brought to when being returned from the Philistines (1 Sam 6:12-20), before being passed on to Kiriath-jearim. The ark was set down beside a great stone, which served as a witness in the field of Joshua of Beth-shemesh (1 Sam 6:18).

It was one of the administrative districts of Solomon (1 Kg 4:9). Beth-shemesh was the site of a battle between King Amaziah of Judah and King Jehoash of Israel (2 Kg 14:11-14).

Tel Beit Shemesh, the site of Beth-shemesh, is a small archaeological tell northeast of the modern city of Beit Shemesh about 20 km (12 miles) west of Jerusalem. It has been well excavated by a number of archaeological expeditions.

Bethany
East Jerusalem Palestine
31° 46' N, 35° 16' E
Gospels
Matt 21, Mark 11, John 11
Road Map
Satellite View
Wikipedia

Tomb of Lazarus (Wikipedia)
 

Bethany is around 3 km (2 miles) east of Jerusalem. It is known as 'Al-Eizariya' in Arabic, which means 'Place of Lazarus'.

In the NT, Bethany is a small village outside of Jerusalem. It was the home of the Mary, Martha and Lazarus, and where Jesus stayed during his passion week, following the triumphal entry into Jerusalem. It was here that Jesus raised Lazarus from the dead (Jn 11).

123456
   
Amphipolis40.816666666666723.8333333333333
Antioch (Pisidia)38.331.1833333333333
Antioch (Syria)36.236.1833333333333
Apollonia40.733333333333324.1333333333333
Arad31.283333333333335.1333333333333
Arnon (River)31.466666666666735.5666666666667
Ashdod31.834.65
Ashkelon31.666666666666734.5666666666667
Assos39.483333333333326.3333333333333
Assur35.4543.2666666666667
Athens37.966666666666723.7166666666667
Attalia36.883333333333330.7
Avaris / Goshen / Rameses30.783333333333331.8166666666667
Babylon32.5544.4166666666667
Balawat36.216666666666743.4
Beatitudes (Mount of)32.883333333333335.55
Beer-sheba31.2534.8333333333333
Beroea40.516666666666722.2
Beth-shemesh31.7534.9833333333333
Bethany31.766666666666735.2666666666667
Bethany beyond the Jordan31.833333333333335.55
Bethel31.916666666666735.2333333333333
Bethlehem31.735.2
Bozrah30.733333333333335.6
Caesarea Maritima32.534.9
Caesarea Philippi33.2535.7
Calah / Nimrud36.143.3333333333333
Capernaum32.883333333333335.5833333333333
Carchemish36.833333333333338.0166666666667
Carmel (Mount)32.666666666666735.0833333333333
Cauda34.833333333333324.0833333333333
Cenchreae37.883333333333323
Chios38.383333333333326.0666666666667
Chorazin32.916666666666735.5666666666667
Cnidus36.683333333333327.3833333333333
Colossae37.783333333333329.2666666666667
Corinth37.922.8833333333333
Cos36.8527.2333333333333
Cove of the Sower32.866666666666735.5666666666667
Dan (Laish)33.2535.65
Derbe37.3533.3666666666667
Ebal (Mount)32.233333333333335.2666666666667
Ecbatana34.848.5166666666667
Ekron31.783333333333334.85
Ephesus37.933333333333327.35
Fair Havens (Crete)34.933333333333324.8
Forum of Appius41.716666666666712.5833333333333
Gath31.734.85
Gaza31.516666666666734.45
Gerizim (Mount)32.235.2666666666667
Gethsemane (Garden of)31.783333333333335.2333333333333
Gibeon31.8535.1833333333333
Haran36.866666666666739.0333333333333
Hazor33.016666666666735.5666666666667
Hebron31.533333333333335.1
Heshbon31.835.8166666666667
Hieropolis37.933333333333329.1333333333333
Iconium37.866666666666732.4833333333333
Jabbok (River)32.116666666666735.55
Jericho31.8535.45
Khorsabad36.516666666666743.2166666666667
Kiriath-jearim31.835.1166666666667
Lachish31.566666666666734.85
Laodicea37.833333333333329.1
Lystra37.632.3333333333333
Malta (St Paul's Bay)35.9514.4
Megiddo32.583333333333335.1833333333333
Miletus37.533333333333327.2833333333333
Mitylene39.126.55
Myra (Lycia)36.266666666666729.9833333333333
Nain32.633333333333335.35
Nazareth32.735.3
Neapolis40.933333333333324.4166666666667
Nebo (Mount)31.766666666666735.7333333333333
Nineveh36.3543.15
Olives (Mount of)31.783333333333335.25
Paphos34.7532.4
Pasargadae30.253.1833333333333
Patara36.266666666666729.3166666666667
Patmos37.333333333333326.55
Penuel (Peniel)32.183333333333335.7
Perga36.966666666666730.85
Pergamum39.116666666666727.1833333333333
Persepolis29.933333333333352.8833333333333
Philadelphia38.3528.5166666666667
Philippi41.016666666666724.2833333333333
Phoenix35.183333333333324.35
Pool of Gibeon31.8535.1833333333333
Ptolemais32.933333333333335.0833333333333
Puteoli40.8514.1
Ramah31.8535.2333333333333
Rhegium38.116666666666715.6666666666667
Rhodes36.166666666666727.9166666666667
Salamis35.183333333333333.9
Samaria (Sebaste)32.266666666666735.2
Samos37.7526.8333333333333
Samothrace40.483333333333325.5166666666667
Sardis38.483333333333328.0333333333333
Seleucia36.116666666666735.9166666666667
Shechem32.216666666666735.2833333333333
Shiloh32.0535.2833333333333
Sidon33.566666666666735.3666666666667
Smyrna38.416666666666727.1333333333333
Succoth (Sukkot)32.183333333333335.5833333333333
Susa32.183333333333348.25
Sychar (Jacob's Well)32.235.2833333333333
Syracuse37.066666666666715.2833333333333
Syrtis31.518
Tabor (Mount)32.683333333333335.3833333333333
Tarsus36.916666666666734.9
Thessalonica40.633333333333322.9333333333333
Three Taverns41.433333333333313.3
Thyatira38.916666666666727.8333333333333
Tirzah32.283333333333335.3333333333333
Troas (Alexandrian Troas)39.7526.1666666666667
Tyre33.266666666666735.2
Ur30.966666666666746.1

The Bible

Pages which look at issues relevant to the whole Bible, such as the Canon of Scripture, as well as doctrinal and theological issues. There are also pages about the Apocrypha, Pseudepigrapha and 'lost books' of the Old Testament.

Also included are lists of the quotations of the OT in the NT, and passages of the OT quoted in the NT.

Why These 66 Books?
Books in the Hebrew Scriptures
Quotations in NT From OT
OT Passages Quoted in NT
History of the English Bible
Twelve Books of the Apocrypha
The Pseudepigrapha - False Writings
Lost Books Referenced in OT

Old Testament Overview

This is a series of six pages which give a historical overview through the Old Testament and the inter-testamental period, showing where each OT book fits into the history of Israel.

OT 1: Creation and Patriarchs
OT 2: Exodus and Wilderness
OT 3: Conquest and Monarchy
OT 4: Divided kingdom and Exile
OT 5: Return from Exile
OT 6: 400 Silent Years

New Testament Overview

This is a series of five pages which give a historical overview through the New Testament, focusing on the Ministry of Jesus, Paul's missionary journeys, and the later first century. Again, it shows where each book of the NT fits into the history of the first century.

NT 1: Life and Ministry of Jesus
NT 2: Birth of the Church
NT 3: Paul's Missionary Journeys
NT 4: Paul's Imprisonment
NT 5: John and Later NT

Introductions to Old Testament Books

This is an almost complete collection of introductions to each of the books in the Old Testament. Each contains information about the authorship, date, historical setting and main themes of the book.

Genesis Exodus Leviticus
Numbers Deuteronomy

Joshua Judges Ruth
1 & 2 Samuel 1 & 2 Kings Chronicles
Ezra & Nehemiah Esther

Job Psalms Proverbs

Isaiah Jeremiah Lamentations
Ezekiel Daniel

Hosea Joel Amos
Obadiah Jonah Micah
Nahum Habakkuk Zephaniah
Haggai Zechariah Malachi

Introductions to New Testament Books

This is a collection of introductions to each of the 27 books in the New Testament. Each contains information about the authorship, date, historical setting and main themes of the book.

Matthew's Gospel Mark's Gospel Luke's Gospel
John's Gospel

Book of Acts

Romans 1 Corinthians 2 Corinthians
Galatians Ephesians Philippians
Colossians 1 & 2 Thessalonians 1 Timothy
2 Timothy Titus Philemon

Hebrews James 1 Peter
2 Peter 1 John 2 & 3 John
Jude

Revelation

Old Testament History

Information about the different nations surrounding Israel, and other articles concerning Old Testament history and the inter-testamental period.

Canaanite Religion
Israel's Enemies During the Conquest
Syria / Aram
The Assyrian Empire
Babylon and its History
The Persian Empire
The Greek Empire
The 400 Silent Years
The Ptolemies and Seleucids
Antiochus IV - Epiphanes

Old Testament Studies

A series of articles covering more general topics for OT studies. These include a list of the people named in the OT and confirmed by archaeology. There are also pages to convert the different units of measure in the OT, such as the talent, cubit and ephah into modern units.

More theological topics include warfare in the ancient world, the Holy Spirit in the OT, and types of Jesus in the OT.

OT People Confirmed by Archaeology
The Jewish Calendar
The Importance of Paradox
Talent Converter (weights)
Cubit Converter (lengths)
OT People Search
Ephah Converter (volumes)
Holy War in the Ancient World
The Holy Spirit in the OT
Types of Jesus in the OT

Studies in the Pentateuch (Gen - Deut)

A series of articles covering studies in the five books of Moses. Studies in the Book of Genesis look at the historical nature of the early chapters of Genesis, the Tower of Babel and the Table of the Nations.

There are also pages about covenants, the sacrifices and offerings, the Jewish festivals and the tabernacle, as well as the issue of tithing.

Are chapters 1-11 of Genesis historical?
Chronology of the Flood
Genealogies of the Patriarchs
Table of the Nations (Gen 10)
Tower of Babel (Gen 11:1-9)

Authorship of the Pentateuch
Chronology of the Wilderness Years
Names of God in the OT
Covenants in the OT
The Ten Commandments
The Tabernacle and its Theology
Sacrifices and Offerings
The Jewish Festivals
Balaam and Balak
Tithing
Highlights from Deuteronomy
Overview of Deuteronomy

Studies in the Old Testament History Books (Josh - Esther)

Articles containing studies and helpful information for the history books. These include a list of the dates of the kings of Israel and Judah, a summary of the kings of the Northern Kingdom of Israel, and studies of Solomon, Jeroboam and Josiah.

There are also pages describing some of the historical events of the period, including the Syro-Ephraimite War, and the Assyrian invasion of Judah in 701 BC.

Dates of the Kings of Judah and Israel
King Solomon
The Kings of Israel
King Jeroboam I of Israel
The Syro-Ephraimite War (735 BC)
Sennacherib's Invasion of Judah (701 BC)
King Josiah of Judah
Differences Between Kings and Chronicles
Chronology of the post-exilic period

Studies in the Old Testament Prophets (Is - Mal)

Articles containing studies and helpful information for the OT prophets. These include a page looking at the way the prophets look ahead into their future, a page looking at the question of whether Satan is a fallen angel, and a page studying the seventy weeks of Daniel.

There are also a series of pages giving a commentary through the text of two of the books:
Isaiah (13 pages) and Daniel (10 pages).

Prophets and the Future
The Call of Jeremiah (Jer 1)
The Fall of Satan? (Is 14, Ezek 28)
Daniel Commentary (10 pages)
Isaiah Commentary (13 pages)
Formation of the Book of Jeremiah


Daniel's Seventy Weeks (Dan 9:24-27)

New Testament Studies

A series of articles covering more general topics for NT studies. These include a list of the people in the NT confirmed by archaeology.

More theological topics include the Kingdom of God and the Coming of Christ.

NT People Confirmed by Archaeology
The Kingdom of God / Heaven
Parousia (Coming of Christ)
The Importance of Paradox

Studies in the Four Gospels (Matt - John)

A series of articles covering various studies in the four gospels. These include a list of the unique passages in each of the Synoptic Gospels and helpful information about the parables and how to interpret them.

Some articles look at the life and ministry of Jesus, including his genealogy, birth narratives, transfiguration, the triumphal entry into Jerusalem, and the seating arrangements at the Last Supper.

More theological topics include the teaching about the Holy Spirit as the Paraclete and whether John the Baptist fulfilled the predictions of the coming of Elijah.

Unique Passages in the Synoptic Gospels
The SynopticProblem
Genealogy of Jesus (Matt 1)
Birth Narratives of Jesus
Understanding the Parables
Peter's Confession and the Transfiguration
Was John the Baptist Elijah?
The Triumphal Entry
The Olivet Discourse (Mark 13)
Important themes in John's Gospel
John's Gospel Prologue (John 1)
Jesus Fulfilling Jewish Festivals
Reclining at Table at the Last Supper
The Holy Spirit as the Paraclete

Studies in the Book of Acts and the New Testament Letters

A series of articles covering various studies in the Book of Acts and the Letters, including Paul's letters. These include a page studying the messages given by the apostles in the Book of Acts, and the information about the financial collection that Paul made during his third missionary journey. More theological topics include Paul's teaching on Jesus as the last Adam, and descriptions of the church such as the body of Christ and the temple, as well as a look at redemption and the issue of fallen angels.

There are a series of pages giving a commentary through the text of five of the books:
Romans (7 pages), 1 Corinthians (7 pages), Galatians (3 pages), Philemon (1 page) and Hebrews (7 pages)

Apostolic Messages in the Book of Acts
Paul and His Apostleship
Collection for the Saints
The Church Described as a Temple
Church as the Body of Christ
Jesus as the Last Adam
Food Offered to Idols
Paul's Teaching on Headcoverings
Who are the Fallen Angels
The Meaning of Redemption
What is the Church?

Romans Commentary (7 pages)

1 Corinthians Commentary (7 pages)

Galatians Commentary (3 pages)

Philemon Commentary (1 page)

Hebrews Commentary (7 pages)

Studies in the Book of Revelation

Articles containing studies and helpful information for the study of the Book of Revelation and topics concerning Eschatology (the study of end-times).

These include a description of the structure of the book, a comparison and contrast between the good and evil characters in the book and a list of the many allusions to the OT. For the seven churches, there is a page which gives links to their location on Google maps.

There is a page studying the important theme of Jesus as the Lamb, which forms the central theological truth of the book. There are pages looking at the major views of the Millennium, as well as the rapture and tribulation, as well as a list of dates of the second coming that have been mistakenly predicted through history.

There is also a series of ten pages giving a detailed commentry through the text of the Book of Revelation.

Introduction to the Book of Revelation
Characters Introduced in the Book
Structure of Revelation
List of Allusions to OT
The Description of Jesus as the Lamb
Virtual Seven Churches of Revelation
The Nero Redivius Myth
The Millennium (1000 years)
The Rapture and the Tribulation
Different Approaches to Revelation
Predicted Dates of the Second Coming

Revelation Commentary (10 pages)

How to do Inductive Bible Study

These are a series of pages giving practical help showing how to study the Bible inductively, by asking a series of simple questions. There are lists of observation and interpretation questions, as well as information about the structure and historical background of biblical books, as well as a list of the different types of figures of speech used in the Bible. There is also a page giving helpful tips on how to apply the Scriptures personally.

How to Study the Bible Inductively
I. The Inductive Study Method
II. Observation Questions
III. Interpretation Questions
IV. Structure of Books
V. Determining the Historical background
VI. Identifying Figures of Speech
VII. Personal Application
VIII. Text Layout

Types of Literature in the Bible

These are a series of pages giving practical help showing how to study each of the different types of book in the Bible by appreciating the type of literature being used. These include historical narrative, law, wisdom, prophets, Gospels, Acts, letters and Revelation.

It is most important that when reading the Bible we are taking note of the type of literature we are reading. Each type needs to be considered and interpreted differently as they have different purposes.

How to Understand OT Narratives
How to Understand OT Law
Hebrew Poetry
OT Wisdom Literature
Understanding the OT Prophets
The Four Gospels
The Parables of Jesus
The Book of Acts
How to Understand the NT Letters
Studying End Times (Eschatology)
The Book of Revelation

Geography and Archaeology

These are a series of pages giving geographical and archaeological information relevant to the study of the Bible. There is a page where you can search for a particular geographical location and locate it on Google maps, as well as viewing photographs on other sites.

There are also pages with photographs from Ephesus and Corinth.

Search for Geographical Locations
Major Archaeological Sites in Israel
Archaeological Sites in Assyria, Babylon and Persia
Virtual Paul's Missionary Journeys
Virtual Seven Churches of Revelation
Photos of the City of Corinth
Photos of the City of Ephesus

Biblical Archaeology in Museums around the world

A page with a facility to search for artifacts held in museums around the world which have a connection with the Bible. These give information about each artifact, as well as links to the museum's collection website where available showing high resolution photographs of the artifact.

There is also page of photographs from the Israel Museum in Jerusalem of important artifacts.

Search Museums for Biblical Archaeology
Israel Museum Photos

Difficult Theological and Ethical Questions

These are a series of pages looking at some of the more difficult questions of Christian theology, including war, suffering, disappointment and what happens to those who have never heard the Gospel.

Christian Ethics
Never Heard the Gospel
Is there Ever a Just War?
Why Does God Allow Suffering
Handling Disappointment

How to Preach

These are a series of pages giving a practical step-by-step explanation of the process of preparing a message for preaching, and how to lead a small group Bible study.

What is Preaching?
I. Two Approaches to Preaching
II. Study a Passage for Preaching
III. Creating a Message Outline
IV. Making Preaching Relevant
V. Presentation and Public Speaking
VI. Preaching Feedback and Critique
Leading a Small Group Bible Study

Information for SBS staff members

Two pages particularly relevant for people serving as staff on the School of Biblical Studies (SBS) in YWAM. One gives helpful instruction about how to prepare to teach on a book in the SBS. The other gives a list of recommended topics which can be taught about for each book of the Bible.

Teaching on SBS Book Topics for SBS